Well, masks are probably one of my favorite things. But these masks are nothing like the creepy historical masks that will scare the life out of you. Have a look for yourself!

If you are a mask lover then you will really stop loving them after seeing these creepy historical masks.

1. Iroquois False Face Society Mask.

This is probably one of the oldest cultures among the indigenous tribes. These masks are a sign of ritualistic believes and practice among the tribes and most of them are simultaneously fascinating and a bit frightening. This society is used as a sort of last resort when none of the other healing societies can cure a patient.

creepy historical masks

2. Visard Mask.

This mask was used by most of the women of the 16th century. But, it was really really creepy, since it was a black and ghoulish sort of a mask. These were multipurpose, as they served to both protect the woman’s skin from the sun and give her an air of mystery. But it went out of style during the 17th century when it became associated with the prostitutes.

creepy historical masks

3. Vintage Halloween Masks.

Halloween these days are not even close to scary than what it used to be. These days, kids really stick to the plain old super-hero masks. But there was a time when Halloween used to be really creepy with the Halloween masks. After all, their purpose is to confuse and ward off the undead wandering the Earth.

creepy historical masks

4. Masks Of Shame.

Schandmaskes, or shame masks, were a German form of punishment used in the 17th and 18th centuries. And more than the masks the reasons are what scare me the most, these included, violating trivial social rules, such as gossiping, telling dirty jokes, or some other social faux pas. Some had donkey ears to signify a fool, long tongues to represent a gossiper or giant pig noses to indicate the person was “dirty.”

creepy historical masks

5. Alexander Pender’s Mask.

In 1663, Presbyterian minister Alexander Peden was on the run for his life. Why do you ask? Because he refused to quit preaching when King Charles II abolished Presbyterianism. Peden sermonized in private houses, fields, and other secret locations. So, long story short, he found a rather weird yet successful way to escape the government. He his well-known face behind a fabric mask adorned with a red beard, wig, wooden teeth, and feathers around the eye slits which made him look more like a demon than a preacher.

creepy historical masks

6. Death Mask.

Yeah, this one’s really creepy. But it is just that the plaster once encased a dead person’s head or that we’re viewing the expression on a lifeless face. But they seem to be really popular.

creepy historical masks

7. Baby Gas Masks.

Gas masks are really creepy historical masks as it is, and now baby gas masks look even more terrifying. Because the babies look like little aliens going for a scuba dive.

creepy historical masks

8. Splatter Masks.

Although these masks look like some type of medieval torture device, they were actually worn for protection by British tank operators at the 1917 Battle of Cambrai in World War I.

creepy historical masks

9. Madam Rowley’s Toilet Mask.

Somebody definitely tell Madam Rowley that this was really bullshit and there wasn’t any real science behind this mask. It was supposed to keep the skin complexion intact but it didn’t do anything except to give the wearer a creepy Hannibal-Lecter look.

creepy historical masks

10. Dirt Eater.

Okay, this definitely scares the fuck out of me. Dirt eating (geophagy) was relatively common among slaves in the 16th–19th centuries. Physicians told the owners their slaves could suffer from depression, stomachaches, dropsy, poor appetite, shortness of breath, and vertigo. So, they decided to take a measure and make them wear this masks.

creepy historical masks

read also: 15 Things That’ll Make You Say “LOL I Thought I Was The Only One”

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